Financial Services

Overview

OC Affordability

Oklahoma Christian University is dedicated to holding down our cost of attendance so we can make a first-rate college education more affordable for students and their families. And in addition to bucking the trend of large tuition increases nationwide, OC doesn't charge student fees.

More than 90% of OC undergraduate students receive financial aid. OC awarded more than $17.5 million in OC scholarships and $14.4 million in federal and state grants last year. OC's need-based grants give students from lower- to middle-income families more financial aid today than ever before.

Use our Net Price Calculator and other links on this site to find the info you need, including our Financial Aid 101 videos. And don't hesitate to call us! You can contact your Personal Financial Counselor (PFC) directly or reach us at 800.877.5010, ext. 5190, or 405.425.5190.

Attending college requires a financial commitment from students, families, the government, and the university. OC is committed to making a high-quality Christian education affordable for you!

Affordability

The cost to attend OC is far below the national average for private colleges. In fact, thanks to a multi-year price freeze, OC's costs have gone up just a little over 3 percent since 2011. That's far lower than the much larger increases at most colleges - both private and public - across the nation. And unlike most universities, Oklahoma Christian does not charge student fees.

More than 90% of our students receive grants and scholarships, making an OC education even more affordable. Students and families can shape their costs with housing and other choices that best fit their budgets and needs.

We also help students graduate in four years by giving them the opportunity to take up to 17 hours per semester for the same base price.

Learn more about what makes OC a great value!

Case Studies

Case 1:

Mary comes from a family of three in Dallas, Texas, and is the only one in her family enrolled in college. Her composite ACT score is 25. Her parents’ combined income was $53,400 last year. Mary did not have an earned income and had very little savings, but her parents have managed to save $16,000 in a non-retirement account.

+ How does it work out?
$0 Student income
$100 Student savings
$53,537 Parent income
$16,000 Parent savings
3 Number in household
1 Number in college
   
$6,000 PASS Academic Scholarship
$5,435 OC Grant
$1,750 Federal Work Study
$3,500 Subsidized Stafford Loan
$2,000 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$2,000 Perkins Loan
$20,685  TOTAL
$4,300 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid
   
$7,000 Parent PLUS Loan
$85.56 Approximate PLUS Loan monthly payment for 10 years

Case 2:

David has a 27 ACT, is from the state of Oregon, and is from a family of three. He earned $2,700 last year and has managed to save $1,000. His parent’s income the previous year was $86,000. David is the only one in his household who will attend college in the upcoming year.

+ How does it work out?
$2,700 Student income
$1,000 Student savings
$86,000 Parent income
$1,000 Parent savings
3 Number in household
1 Number in college
   
$6,000 PASS Academic Scholarship
$1,750 Federal Work Study
$3,500 Subsidized Stafford Loan
$2,000 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$13,250 TOTAL
$11,750 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid
   
$13,000 Parent PLUS Loan
$157.04 Approximate PLUS Loan monthly payment for 10 years

Case 3:

Josh comes from a single parent household in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and did not earn any income last year. He has no siblings so he is the only one attending college from his household. His mother’s taxable income last year was $29,000, but she also had an additional $16,000 of non-taxable income. Josh and his mom have virtually no savings. His composite SAT was 1100 (excluding the writing portion).

+ How does it work out?
$0 Student income
$0 Student savings
$29,000 Parent income
$500 Parent savings
$16,000 Parent untaxed income
2 Number in household
1 Number in college
   
$4,000 PASS Academic Scholarship
$1,000 Art & Design Scholarship
$1,300 Oklahoma Tuition Aid Grant (OTAG)
$2,000 Oklahoma Tuition Equalization Grant (OTEG)
$3,216 Oklahoma’s Promise (OHLAP)
$5,550 Federal Pell Grant
$525 Federal Supplemental Grant (SEOG)
$1,750 Federal Work Study
$3,500 Subsidized Stafford Loan
$2,000 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$24,841 TOTAL
$136 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid
   
$2,000 Parent PLUS Loan
$50 Approximate PLUS Loan monthly payment for 47 months

Case 4:

Stacy has a 25 composite ACT and is from central California. She is the only one attending college from a family of five. Her parents earned $122,000 last year and have non-retirement investment accounts totaling $95,000. Stacy has saved almost $4,000.

+ How does it work out?
$700 Student income
$3,900 Student savings
$9,600 Student untaxed income
$122,000 Parent income
$6,200 Parent savings
$95,000 Parent Net Worth of Investments
3 Number in household
1 Number in college
   
$6,000 PASS Academic Scholarship
$5,500 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$11,500 TOTAL
$13,500 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid
   
$15,000 Parent PLUS Loan
$181.20 Approximate PLUS Loan monthly payment for 10 years

Case 5:

John comes from a family of five with one other brother in college. He made a 29 on his ACT, but did not earn an income in the previous year and has virtually no savings. His parents combined income was $76,000. They also have very little in savings.

+ How does it work out?
$0 Student income
$0 Student savings
$76,000 Parent income
$1,600 Parent savings
$8,000 Net worth of investments
5 Number in household
2 Number in college
   
$8,000 PASS Academic Scholarship
$5,200 OC Grant
$1,750 Federal Work Study
$3,500 Subsidized Stafford Loan
$2,000 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$2,000 Perkins Loan
$22,450 TOTAL
$2,550 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid
   
$5,000 Parent PLUS Loan
$60.40 Approximate PLUS Loan monthly payment for 10 years

Case 6:

Sherry and her brother were raised by their father and are both now in college. Their father had a taxable income of $36,000 last year and received an additional $2,400 in untaxed income. Sherry also earned $6,600 in her part-time work, but was unable to save much of her earnings. She scored a 960 on her SAT (excluding the writing portion).

+ How does it work out?
$6,600 Student income
$50 Student savings
$36,000 Parent income
$200 Parent savings
$2,400 Parent untaxed income
3 Number in household
2 Number in college
   
$4,900 OC Grant
$4,300 Federal Pell Grant
$525 Federal Supplemental Grant (SEOG)
$1,750 Federal Work Study
$3,500 Subsidized Stafford Loan
$2,000 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$16,975 TOTAL
$8,025 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid
   
$9,500 Parent PLUS Loan
$114.76 Approximate PLUS Loan monthly payment for 10 years

Case 7:

Colby is 24 years old and is from the state of Kansas. He transferred to OC with a 3.3 GPA. His annual income was just more than $22,000. He is not married and has no children or other dependents.

+ How does it work out?
$22,419 Student income
$0 Student savings
$500 Student untaxed income
N/A Parent income
N/A Parent savings
1 Number in household
1 Number in college
   
$4,500 Transfer Academic Scholarship
$4,000 OC Grant
$1,750 Federal Work Study
$5,500 Subsidized Stafford Loan
$7,000 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$22,750 TOTAL
$2,250 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid

Case 8:

Jonni earned a 28 on her ACT. Including her parents, there are four in her household. Both she and her sister are full-time college students. Jonni earned a small income last year and has very little in savings. Her parents have a combined income of $230,000.

+ How does it work out?
$11,000 Student income
$50 Student savings
$230,000 Parent income
$2,000 Parent savings
4 Number in household
2 Number in college
   
$8,000 PASS Academic Scholarship
$5,500 Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
$13,500 TOTAL
$11,500 Estimated Net Cost after Financial Aid
   
$13,000 Parent PLUS Loan
$157.04 Approximate PLUS Loan monthly payment for 10 years

Video

More Stories

  • Saturday, November 01

    Join Oklahoma Christian University President, John deSteiguer, in the home of Krista Glover on Saturday, November 1, 2014 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. to learn more about Oklahoma Christian University.

  • Tuesday, November 04

    Join Oklahoma Christian University President, John deSteiguer, in the home of Don and Donna Millican on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. to learn more about Oklahoma Christian University.

  • Tuesday, November 11

    Join Oklahoma Christian University's Dean of the College of Natural and Health Sciences (along with multiple faculty members) in DFW on Tuesday, November 11, 2014 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

  • Friday, November 14

    Campus Connect, November 14: OC's one-day, small group, comprehensive visit event

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